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Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein has semicha from YU (RIETS) and a PhD from Harvard. He has worked in shul rabbinate, high school and adult education. He is the author of both fiction and non-fiction, most recently "As If We Were There: Readings for a Transformative Passover Experience". He lives in Riverdale, NY.

NEW! Cheating People Out of Money: Which Prohibitons Are You Violating, and How?

Halacha (Jewish Law)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

From a seemingly simple obligation like paying workers on time to robbing others outright, the Torah inserts numerous safeguards to prevent us from wrongly possessing other people's money. By looking at the Talmudic and halachic presentation of several of the Biblical prohibitions against cheating others out of money-- withholding wages, robbery, interest, and overcharging-- we hope to gain a better understanding of the Torah's view of honesty and of the nature of possessions.

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NEW! The Value of Biblical Fiction

Chumash (Bible: Torah)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

Jewish fiction goes back to medieval times, and comes in varying shapes and sizes. Through an intensive discussion of his own two works, Murderer in the Mikdash and Cassandra Misreads the Book of Samuel (and other Untold Tales of the Prophets), Rabbi Rothstein will give his perspective on what fiction does and how it can contribute to a well-lived Jewish life.

 

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NEW! Weekends @ WebYeshiva: Teshuva

Special: Other Topics in Judaism
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

 

Are you too busy to learn during the week?

WebYeshiva is offering a new Sunday morning program starting in the Elul Zman.

Specifically geared to those who lack time during the week to attend shiurim, Weekends@WebYeshiva is a way for you to take advantage of Torah learning during your weekend!

The program will showcase WebYeshiva's finest teachers and feature different topics every week.

You bring the coffee, we'll bring the Torah!

There is no charge for this program.

Sunday August 29th: Rabbi Jeffrey Saks will be discussing 'Teshuva of love, Teshuva of fear.'

Sunday September 5th: Rabbi Chaim Brovender will discuss 'Elul:  Time for Teshuva.'

Sunday September 12th: Rabbi Gidon Rothstein will teach 'The Hardest Step of Teshuva: Recognizing the Sin.'

 

 

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NEW! What makes a prophet?

Special: Other Topics in Judaism
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

Sure, we know Moshe Rabbenu was a prophet, we know Yeshayahu and Yirmiyahu were prophets, but what does that mean? We will start by analyzing the mitzvot related to prophecy - when we have to listen to them, when not - and move on to a discussion of the qualifications to be a prophet, the powers of a prophet, and the experiene of prophecy. Much of the course will focus on Rambam's discussions of the issue, but if time permits, we will also look into R. Kook's views as well.

 

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NEW! Neglected Chapters of Rambam’s Hilchot Teshuvah

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

While much attention is paid to Rambam's views of repentance, his Laws deal with many other central topics of Jewish faith, in his eyes relevant to full repentance. By analyzing his perspective of sins that are more serious or significant than others, his ideas about free will and pre-determination, and his view of the reward we are promised for mitzvot, we hope to come to a deeper understanding of how to improve our spiritual state and our relationship with God.

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NEW! From Long Life to Long Life: A Lesser Known Section of the Aruch haShulchan

Halacha (Jewish Law)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

Beginning from the laws of honoring parents, we will try to cover much of the Aruch haShulchan's discussion ranging from there until the laws of sending away the mother bird, halachot that sandwich other interesting halachot, such as those of Torah study, giving charity, and affixing mezuzot to our doorposts.

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Philosophy of Rav Soloveitchik Part 2

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

This semester, we hope to study three more of the Rov's yahrzeit shiurim, on the nature of public fast days, the fellowship created during the recitation of Birkat HaMazon, and the obligation to tell the story of the Exodus of Egypt. Throughout, as in this semester, we will be on the lookout for the recurring and major themes in the Rov's thought and halachic experience

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NEW! Ask Your Father,Keep the Torah of Your Mother-Minhag Structure

Special: Other Topics in Judaism
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

By tracing the halachic use of two verses, we will find out what makes a minhag (custom), and what its force is in the halachic system, and when minhagim continue or cease to obligate us.

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Philosophy of Rav Soloveitchik Part 1

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

This shiur will seek to plumb the Rov's central philosophical and popular presentations for the main ideas of his thought.  Taking his presentations to the World Zionist Organization, gathered in Hamesh Derashot, his renowned Teshuvah drashas, from Al haTeshuvah, and his extended presentations of the nature of the religious Jew, in Halachic Man, U-vikashtem mi-Sham, and Halachic MInd, we will strive to understand how the Rov understood the nature of Jewish religiosity, and how we can best translate that into personal and communal reality.

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NEW! Teshuva in the Thought of Rav Yitchak Hutner

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

For Jews, teshuva can be like the weather.  We talk about it all the time, make little headway on it, and yet always find something new to say. Given the voluminous literature on teshuvah pre-dating the 20th century, we might have thought that there was little more of interest to be said. Into this packed world stepped R. Yitzchak Hutner, z'l, the Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshivat R. Chaim Berlin.  Rav Hutner delivered talks which were later collected in volumes titled Pachad Yitzchak. By taking some of his discussions of repentance, we will see the originality and complexity of this subtle and nuanced thinker.

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Tzidkat HaTzaddik of Rav Tzaddik HaCohen

Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

R. Tzadok haCohen of Lublin lived in the mid-late 1800's and was renowned as a prodigy from a Lithuanian family before joining the Chasidic movement as a student of R. Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Izbica (known as the Izbitzer).  A prolific writer, his Tzidkat haTzaddik offers his view of how a person can best serve God, and is filled with fascinating claims of a psychological, spiritual, and kabbalistic nature.

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NEW! The Thought of Rav Kook

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

If the center of Jewish spiritual development is fear and love of God, what are the components of those characteristics? Using Mussar Avicha, one of R. Kook's early works, we will analyze how he understood the religious personality and its development

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The Philosophy of Rabbi Joseph B Soloveitchik

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

This shiur will seek to plumb the Rov's central philosophical and popular presentations for the main ideas of his thought. Taking his presentations to the World Zionist Organization, gathered in Hamesh Derashot, his renowned Teshuvah drashas, from Al haTeshuvah, and his extended presentations of the nature of the religious Jew, in Halachic Man, U-vikashtem mi-Sham, and Halachic MInd, we will strive to understand how the Rov understood the nature of Jewish religiosity, and how we can best translate that into personal and communal reality.

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NEW! Not Just Words: Rethinking the High Holiday Prayers

Machshava (Jewish Thought)
Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein

The High Holidays, beginning with Selichot the week before Rosh HaShana and continuing through the end of Yom Kippur, introduce prayers that are largely restricted to those times of the year.  While the 13 Middot, the Attributes of Mercy, are said at other times, their central recitation is as part of Selichot.  The middle blessings of the Mussaf of Rosh haShana, Malchuyot, Zichronot, and Shofarot, tell us about how our Rabbis understood the various blowings of the Shofar, while the Avoda of Yom Kippur, the liturgical poem that recalls the High Priest's service, is central to our experience of that day. The course will study each of these three prayers, looking to understand how they can enrich and expand our experience of this vital season of the year.

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