• December 4, 2022
  • 10 5783, Kislev
  • פרשת וישלח

Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen

Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen

Judaism includes many special laws about foods cooked or prepared by non-Jews. In this class, we will focus on food cooked by non-Jews (Bishul Akum), bread baked by non-Jews (Pat Akum) and dairy products farmed by non-Jews (Chalav Akum).

November 1, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 1
Class description

Today we discussed the fundamental ideas behind the prohibition of wine handled by non-Jews. Specifically we discussed the two concerns that Chazal had: (a) a concern that jews may deal with wine that was actually used in a pagan ritual and (b) a concern that by drinking wine with non-Jews, Jews may eventually marry non-Jews. We saw that in the time of Rashi there was a realization that the first concern was no longer relevant and that it was possible to permit Jews to trade in “stam yeinam” though the prohibition against drinking “stam yeinam” is still relevant.

Handouts
November 8, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 2
Class description

Today we discussed the halacha of “cooked wine”- yayin mevushal. We saw the discussion of the contemporary Poskim who judged whether the fact that almost all wines and grape-juices are pasteurized means that all those products have the status of mevushal.

Handouts
November 15, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 3
Class description

First I’d like to welcome the two new students from Poland who attended the shiur today. Along with our friend Joel Chaim Nowitzky that makes 3 students. My father z”l was from Poland and I think he would be pleased to know that once again there are Jews in Poland who have a desire to learn Torah. Today we finished the series on the laws of wine (since we have to move on to other subjects). We discussed what sort of contact makes the wine non-kosher and we discussed when wine-additives make other beverages non-kosher (particularly whiskey blended with wine or stored in casks that were used to store wine). In thelast minute we ran through the Rambam and Rashi/Tosafot who ruled that Moslems and Christians do not cause wine to be assur b’hana’ah (but the wine is forbidden to be consumed). Thanks to everyone who participated in the shiurim. I think that next week we will cover milk produced by non-Jews

Handouts
November 22, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 4
Class description

Today we began studying the laws about milk produced without Jewish supervision. We saw that the level of supervision required for Chalav Yisrael is not particularly onerous. On the other hand, we ended the shiur with the psak of the Rama that even if we possess an extremely high level of certainty that no non-kosher milk was added to what we are certain is kosher milk, the milk is forbidden. The reason for this psak is that once Chazal decreed that only milk whose production was supervised by Jews can be used, all other milks are forbidden, regardless of the circumstances of its production. Next week, bli neder, we will see the various responsa of Poskim who discuss this issue.

November 29, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 5
Class description

Last week we saw that Chazal forbade Jews from partaking of milk that was milked by a non-Jew , unless if a Jew witnessed the milking. Chazal were concerned that non-kosher milk may have been blended into the kosher milk. Today we saw the discussion among the poskim if this prohibition is relevant in a situation where there are no non-kosher animals in the vicinity. There are great authorities who permitted the milk but we saw that the consensus of Ashkenazi authorities is to rule that the prohibition of chalav Akum applies to all circumstances. At the end of the shiur we saw the teshuva of Rav Moshe Feinstein zt”l whose analysis of the subject and of the circumstances in the United States led hom to rule leniently on the matter.

Handouts
December 6, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 6
Class description

Last week we saw that Chazal forbade Jews from partaking of milk that was milked by a non-Jew , unless if a Jew witnessed the milking. Chazal were concerned that non-kosher milk may have been blended into the kosher milk. Today we saw the discussion among the poskim if this prohibition is relevant in a situation where there are no non-kosher animals in the vicinity. There are great authorities who permitted the milk but we saw that the consensus of Ashkenazi authorities is to rule that the prohibition of chalav Akum applies to all circumstances. At the end of the shiur we saw the teshuva of Rav Moshe Feinstein zt”l whose analysis of the subject and of the circumstances in the United States led hom to rule leniently on the matter. Today we completed the discussion of milk. We saw how Rav Feinstein and the Chazon Ish explain that government supervision satisfies the requirements of the Halacha with respect to verifying that the milk is kosher. We saw that other Poskim feel that the level of certainty provided by government supervision does n ot satisfy the demand of Halacha for certainty. Those who forbid unsupervised milk has the status of being “inherently” prohibited and thus cannot be permitted by any argument at all.

December 13, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 7
Class description

Last week we saw that Chazal forbade Jews from partaking of milk that was milked by a non-Jew , unless if a Jew witnessed the milking. Chazal were concerned that non-kosher milk may have been blended into the kosher milk. Today we saw the discussion among the poskim if this prohibition is relevant in a situation where there are no non-kosher animals in the vicinity. There are great authorities who permitted the milk but we saw that the consensus of Ashkenazi authorities is to rule that the prohibition of chalav Akum applies to all circumstances. At the end of the shiur we saw the teshuva of Rav Moshe Feinstein zt”l whose analysis of the subject and of the circumstances in the United States led hom to rule leniently on the matter. Today we completed the discussion of milk. We saw how Rav Feinstein and the Chazon Ish explain that government supervision satisfies the requirements of the Halacha with respect to verifying that the milk is kosher. We saw that other Poskim feel that the level of certainty provided by government supervision does n ot satisfy the demand of Halacha for certainty. Those who forbid unsupervised milk has the status of being “inherently” prohibited and thus cannot be permitted by any argument at all. Hello everyone, I apologize if I spoke too rapidly today but I am trying to squeeze a lot of material in to the time which remains. Anyway, today we began the discussion of cheeses made by non-Jews. The discussion of the prohibition is striking because of the obscure dialogue in the Mishna in which Rabbi Yehoshua avoids explaining the prohibition to Rabbi Yishmael. We ended with a look at the Tosafot who related that it is difficult to understand why cheeses made with only kosher ingredients should be forbidden and they mention that there were communities in France where the rabbis permitted such cheeses.

December 20, 2011 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Jews and Non-Jews in the Kitchen: Lesson 8
Class description

Today we finished the discussion about cheeses. We saw the opinions about cottage cheese (Aruch Hashulchan and Iggerot Moshe) if cheeses which don’t need rennett are included in the prohibition . We concluded with the Shem Mishmuel’s dvar Torah for Channukka. Chag sameiach to everyone, and i look forward to learning with you in the next z’man.

Rabbi Dr. Stuart Fischman graduated from Yeshiva University in 1980 and the dental school of Columbia University in 1985. In 1989 he began studying and teaching at Yeshivat Hamivtar and now studies and teaches at Yeshivat Machanaim in Efrat. He has rabbinic ordination from Rav Zalman Nechemia Goldberg.