• November 15, 2019
  • 17 5780, Cheshvan
  • פרשת וירא

Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?

Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?

The sages taught us that the zealous performance of mitzvot is swift (זריזין מקדימין למצוות). Why is zeal equated with performing mitzvot at the first opportunity? How fast are we required to rush to fulfill a mitzva? Is it better to rush and minimally fulfill a mitzva or to wait until you can do the mitzva better? Should a brit mila be scheduled in the early morning or later when more guests can attend? Must Chanukah candles be lit at the beginning of the night, or can you wait and light them later? Join Rabbi Dovid Fink and survey the opinions of the great poskim on these and related matters.

January 3, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 1
Class description

We begin the sources calling for zeal and speed in the performance of mitzvot. Exactly how important is it to rush to do a mitzvah? When is it better to wait and perform a mitzvah at a later time?

January 10, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 2
Class description

1) The opinion of those poskim who hold that Brit Mila should be done as early in the day as possible. 2) The opinion of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, who held that Brit Mila should be delayed until it can be done in a festive manner. 3) Beginning of the text of the Shaarei Gan Eden regarding halachically improper prayers (like prayers recited too late in the day).

January 17, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 3
Class description

Today we conclude the text of Shaarei Gan Eden, providing some justification for prayers and other mitzvot performed too late in the day. Then we begin the issue of drawing conclusion from the deeds of the Patriarchs (Avraham, Yitschak, and Yaakov), who lived before the Torah was given to us at Mt. Sinai.

January 24, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 4
Class description

Which is more important: (1) performing a mitzvah at the first opportunity with zeal; or (2) delaying the performance of the mitzvah so that it can be done in a better way?

January 31, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 5
Class description

According to R. Yosef Karo and the Trumot ha-Deshen, speed is preferable to superior performance of a mitsva when there is some doubt about whether you will be able to do the mitzvah later. Examples: Halitsa with a younger brother when waiting for the elder brother entails delay and kiddush levana during the week when waiting for Saturday night entails a doubt about whether it will be cloudy.

February 7, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 6
Class description

It is correct to delay a mitzvah if you are sure that you will be able to perform the mitzvah in a better way latter. But if you are in doubt about whether you will be able to perform the mitzvah later, you should perform it now without delay. This leads to a discussion regarding the definition of doubt (safek).

February 14, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 7
Class description

Today we cover the opinions of the Baal ha-Tanya of Lubavitch, the Radbaz of Egypt, the Chacham Tsvi of Amsterdam, and the Mishna Brura.

February 21, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 8
Class description

The opinion of the Nishmat Adam (by R. Avraham Danzig) based on the Sefer Hasidim.

March 7, 2018 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zeal & Mitzvot: How Fast Should You Run?: Lesson 9
Class description

What is better: asking an agent to perform a mitzvah for you with zeal or performing it yourself with delay? Should you spend money to perform a mitzvah with zeal? R. Moshe Feinstein’s opinion regarding wives following their husbands’ opinions.

In addition to being one of Rabbi Brovender's first students, Rabbi Dovid Fink is an outstanding expertᅠand teacher of Halacha. Rabbi Fink received his Rabbinic ordination from ITRI and the Mir and was awarded his Ph.D in Semitic Languages and Linguistics from Yale University. Rav Fink has taught thousands of students from all over the world for over 35 years.